Law Offices of Jess C. Bedore III - Certified Specialist in Criminal Law
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Prevalence of alcohol puts drug charges into focus

A lot is made out of the narcotics and drugs that are prevalent in society. Heroin, cocaine, marijuana, meth -- all of these substances carry with them a very negative connotation, and rightfully so.

However, it is hard to commiserate with the side of the law that seeks "justice" of those who deal with drugs because it is also the side the permits people to consume alcohol, which is by far the most deadly substance in the United States. Alcohol plays a role in homicides equivalent to the role played by practically all other substances combined in homicides. When you talk about other, more specific crimes -- such as domestic violence or sex crimes -- alcohol is also a very prevalent factor.

Our source article for this blog post provides some incredible data regarding alcohol and the role it plays in crime, both for the perpetrator and the victim. This is a serious issue, but we also want to relate it back to the way drug criminals are handled and punished.

Drug criminals face consequences from the legal system that not only ruin their lives in the short-term. These consequences also ruin their lives forever, potentially. Mandatory minimum sentencing and excessive charges related to drugs often place defendants in impossible situations where they have to take a plea deal.

Even when their punishment is over, it really isn't -- they have to reset their lives, trying to find a place to live and a place to work. Often times, that task is just as difficult as the position prosecutors put them in. The national debate about drugs and the punishments involved rages on, but considering how freely alcohol is sold and consumed, it is time for some real action regarding the treatment and consequences drug criminals face.

Source: Washington Post, "Alcohol is still the deadliest drug in the United States, and it's not even close," Harold Pollack, Aug. 19, 2014

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